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Understanding the child support formula

When there is a divorce in Mississippi and children are involved, it is important to understand how child support will factor in with the case. Parents undoubtedly want what is best for their kids and that includes making certain they have everything they need to thrive. Medical coverage, clothes, a safe environment in which to live and more are critical.

Paying support for these issues is imperative, but there is often a disagreement as to how much the supporting parent must pay to the custodial parent. To make the process as smooth as possible, the state has a child support formula that it uses.

The formula is part of the child support guidelines and is the law. The non-custodial parent will pay a portion of his or her income to the custodial parent to care for the child. It is based on adjusted gross income. There are percentages that are formulated based on how many children the couple shares. For one child, the payments will be 14% of the adjusted gross income; for two children, it is 20%; for three, it is 22%; for four, it is 24%; and for five or more, it is 26%.

The payments will be ongoing until the child is emancipated. There can be a court order to stop or reduce the child support when the child turns 18, but it ends when the child is enrolled in school full-time or leaves the home to establish and independent living situation by becoming employed full-time and stopping any education before age 21. It will also cease if he or she lives with another person without being given permission by the supporting parent. The payments will stop if the child joins the military full-time, gets married, or is found guilty of a felony and receives a jail sentence of a minimum of two years. Apart from those circumstances, the payments will continue until the child is emancipated by turning 21.

Child support can be a complicated matter for the non-custodial parent, the custodial parent and the supported child or children. To deal with issues and concerns related to child support such as a modification or for any other reason, having legal assistance is essential. Calling a law firm experienced in child support may help with a case.

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