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Child Support Archives

Mississippi ranks last among states in child welfare

A recent study has delivered a sad verdict on Mississippi's ability to provide for its children. The study was prepared by the Annie E. Casey Foundation Kids Count Data Center. According to the study, Mississippi ranks last among the 50 states in overall child welfare. The study examined Mississippi's ability to provide children with foster care and health care. An important implication of the study is the critical role played by child custody and child support orders in divorce cases.

Determining child support and custody in Mississippi divorces

When Mississippi couples decide to end their marriages, their attention most often turns to their children. Who will get custody? How much child support will the court order paid by the non-custodial parent? The answers to these questions are often complicated by the specific situation of the divorcing spouses, and this post is able only to provide a summary of the law.

Mississippi man jailed for failure to pay child support

This blog recently discussed child support enforcement resources and child support modification options as well. A Mississippi man was recently jailed for failure to pay child support. The man owes $223,000 in unpaid back child support. The 50-year old man was recently arrested for contempt of court. He and his ex-wife were married for 16 years and divorced in 2004 with 3 children. Both are from Mississippi.

How are child support orders enforced in Mississippi?

Child support is important for children and families which is why there are a variety of methods by which child support orders are enforced. It is important to keep in mind that family law resources are available to parents seeking to enforce a child support order, as well as parents struggling to comply with a child support order who may need to seek a modification of a child support order. Both paying and recipient parents may wonder, however, by what methods child support obligations are enforced in Mississippi.

What constitutes income for Mississippi child support purposes?

When two parents in Mississippi divorce, or if they were not married but are no longer in a relationship with one another, the court will need to determine how much child support to award the custodial parent. When determining how much child support to award, the judge needs to ascertain the parent's adjusted gross income. As a Gulfport resident might wonder, what is included as gross income for child support purposes?

Some child support issues require legal help

In Mississippi, the amount of child support a noncustodial parent will owe to the custodial parent is based on a formula. This formula is based on a number of factors, including each parent's income, how much time the child spends with each parent and others. However, what if these numbers are not correctly reported?

When can the Mississippi child support guidelines be rebutted?

It goes without saying that, whether a child's parents are in a relationship, raising a child costs money. If a child's parents are divorced, in general, the noncustodial parent will pay child support to the custodial parent. Mississippi has statutory guidelines that determine how much child support a parent will owe. However, per Mississippi Code, Section 43-19-103, there could be a deviation from the guidelines under certain circumstances.

How is child support determined in Mississippi?

When Mississippi residents are parting ways and share a child, one of the biggest concerns they will eventually have to deal with is how much the supporting parent will have to pay the custodial parent to care for the child. The state has a child support formula based on the law. This details how much the supporting parent will pay.